Public input needed on wild dog management strategy

Wild-dog

Input from the public is essential in developing an effective strategy.

Local communities, groups and individuals are invited to have their say in developing the NSW Wild Dog Management Strategy 2017-2021 to reduce the impacts of wild dogs.

NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) invasive species strategy manager, Quentin Hart, said wild dogs cause real problems with negative impacts on communities and the environment.

“The national impact of wild dogs on livestock, including control costs, is estimated to vary between $50 million to hundreds of millions of dollars annually,” Mr Hart said.

“They cause physical and emotional distress to farming and urban communities by attacking livestock and pets.

“We aim to build on the 2012-2017 strategy, which was endorsed by the peak body overseeing pest animal policy and programs, the NSW Pest Animal Council, to deliver a framework which will continue to reduce wild dog impacts across the state.”

NSW DPI, Local Land Services, NSW Farmers’ Association, NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service and the National Wild Dog Facilitator, with links to the National Wild Dog Action Plan and the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre, are working to help develop the latest strategy.

Mr Hart said input from the public is essential in developing an effective strategy.

“Coordination and cooperation between public and private land managers is the key to effective management of all pest animals and is a focus of the strategy,” he said.

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